Artist Statement

Most of my inspiration comes from nature.  I’m taken with the beauty of a milkweed; its silken seeds emerging from a pod, frozen water forming translucent drips on branches after an ice storm, fern-like patterns forming on glass after a blustery cold night that resemble my own saliva fern patterns.  I love vines that relentlessly climb structures to get closer to the sun, and irises, that when looked closely at; between the inner folds and creases, reveal a soft layered beauty.  I’m conscious of Earth’s cycles and the natural rhythms of life; lunar phases, ocean tides, the migration of birds, and how a folded bud anticipates the birth of spring.  Rocks, glaciers, plants, and animals all evolve in concert with these processes.  Humans too, exist within this cycle of nature.  I’m conscious of my own female reproductive system that operates in a similar cyclical rhythm.  By charting my fertility signals such as basal body temperature, cervical mucus, and cervical position each day allows me to be in tune with nature’s wider cycles.  My work captures the connection between humans and nature through subtle representations.

We all have associations with these life cycles. I want my sculptures to reveal the body as the place where the self is most urgently located and understood. I make the conscious decision for my work to be fragmented so the focus becomes universal emotion rather than a singular narrative. Likewise, my vessels and the decorative elements come together to convey similar feelings. By exposing human experience, cyclical nature, or fragments of my imagination, I am creating art with the notion of illuminating these truths.

As an artist I feel most alive when I am working in clay, each piece becoming a natural expression of my inner self. I’m deeply introspective, and when my hands are in clay, I’m often able to release the wonders inside of me that stimulate my everyday life.  Excitement comes from working at a larger scale.  The physicality of the material awakens my body.  This aliveness that I feel often pushes me beyond what I once perceived as mental and physical barriers.

Clay is the material I choose because it engages my senses.  I love making objects that express my surroundings, where my sense of beauty and form is evident. What I make is not merely objects; they are expressions of me: what I see, what I feel, and what I think.  By using clay, I capture a moment in time, in my attempt to communicate life experiences.  I encourage others to view my art and allow it to become personal.  I’m mindful of the connection between clay, my work, and the human condition.  By continuing my practice, through the process of clay and its own cycle, I (and my work) evolve.